The modern jazz quartet - reunion at budokan 1981


The 1950s saw the emergence of free jazz , which explored playing without regular meter, beat and formal structures, and in the mid-1950s, hard bop emerged, which introduced influences from rhythm and blues , gospel , and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing. Modal jazz developed in the late 1950s, using the mode , or musical scale, as the basis of musical structure and improvisation. Jazz-rock fusion appeared in the late 1960s and early 1970s, combining jazz improvisation with rock music 's rhythms, electric instruments, and highly amplified stage sound. In the early 1980s, a commercial form of jazz fusion called smooth jazz became successful, garnering significant radio airplay. Other styles and genres abound in the 2000s, such as Latin and Afro-Cuban jazz .

The Modern Jazz Quartet recorded Django on December 23, 1954 with one of the last recordings that included drummer Kenny Clarke. A few months later Clarke decided to move to Paris and was replaced by Connie Kay. That lineup stayed together almost 40 years until Kay’s death in 1994. Django is one of John Lewis’ most lyrical compositions. It is dedicated to Django Reinhardt who died in May 1953, a year before this recording was made.


The Modern Jazz Quartet - Reunion At Budokan 1981The Modern Jazz Quartet - Reunion At Budokan 1981The Modern Jazz Quartet - Reunion At Budokan 1981The Modern Jazz Quartet - Reunion At Budokan 1981

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